Celsius to Fahrenheit

Celsius to Fahrenheit temperature converter
 

Celsius (°C) Fahrenheit (°F)

 
 

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Celsius to Fahrenheit converter

Celsius

The degree Celsius (symbol: °C) is a unit of temperature approved for use with the SI. The degree Celsius is equal to exactly one kelvin, which is defined as 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water. The Celsius or centigrade scale is related to the kelvin (absolute) scale by setting the temperature zero degrees Celsius (0°C) to be exactly 273.15 K, thus absolute zero is -273.15°C. The original centigrade scale was developed by Carolus Linnaeus in 1744 and set the temperature of the melting point of water (at atmospheric pressure) to 0°C, and the boiling point of water (at atmospheric pressure) to 100°C.

The Formulas of converting Celsius - Fahrenheit

Explanation of the Formulas of converting Celsius - Fahrenheit

Measuring Temperature

(Eureka! Episode 20 - You Tube cast)

A short YouTube movie on understanding temperature

Eureka! shows viewers how Swedish scientist Anders Celsius invented the Celsius thermometer, using the expansion of mercury as a measure of temperature.
Very good as teaching aid.

"When the degree of hotness - or temperature- of something goes up, its molecules go faster and it expands. This expansion can therefore be used to measure temperature itself. A device which does this is called a "hotness-meter" or thermometer. On the Celsius scale thermometer, the level to which mercury contracts at the freezing point of water is labelled 0 °C, and the level to which mercury expands at the boiling point of water is labelled 100 °C. "

Anders Celsius

Anders Celsius

Anders Celsius

(1701 - 1744)

The Celsius scale is named for Anders Celsius (1701 – 1744), a Swedish astronomer, who developed a temperature scale similar to Linnaeus' scale in 1742, but with zero at the boiling point of water, and 100 degrees at the melting point. Due to the redefinition of the degree Celsius and the definition of "standard atmospheric pressure", the melting point of ice at standard atmospheric pressure is no longer 0°C, but is 0.002519°C[1], and the boiling point of water at standard atmospheric pressure is not exactly 100°C, but is estimated as 99.9839 °C